27 year old Zoology BSc graduate, fixed-term zoo keeper at Woburn Safari Park, general animal fanatic and massive geek. I've worked in the Arachnida & Myriapoda department of the NHM in London and been to Madagascar to do some conservation work. Here you will find: Zoology, animals, nature, science, anatomy, facts, funny things, geeky stuff, running, cycling, positive thinking, more zoology, and a lot of my boyfriend, James! Welcome and enjoy!!

 

libutron:

Common Cuttlefish Reproduction
Categorized as a shallow water cephalopod, the Common Cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis (Sepiidae), is generally found in the eastern North Atlantic, throughout the English Channel, and south into the Mediterranean Sea, though populations have also been recorded along the west coast of Africa, and as far south as South Africa.
In the spring and summer, male and females migrate to shallow, warmer waters to spawn. They exhibit elaborate courtships, wherein males attract females through spectacular displays of colored bands passing rapidly along their bodies. Males then hold their arms stiffly in a basket formation to show their virility. Similarly, females display a uniform gray color when ready to mate. 
Mating in Sepia officinalis involves internal fertilization, so, eventually the male will grasp a female and mate with her. Using a modified arm, known as the hectocotylus, the male passes spermatophores to the female.
After mating, fertilized eggs are stored in the oviduct of the female until they are ready to be deposited. The female deposits eggs one by one in clusters on seaweeds, shells, or even debris. She blackens them for camouflage with the same ink that cuttlefish use to cast a smoke screen against large predators. The male often remains at her side for some time, but he has no romantic intentions. He is merely trying to prevent her from mating with another male. Mate guarding, in which males aggressively fight over and guard their females, is common.

After spawning both male and females die.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Joris van Alphen | Locality: Oosterschelde, Zeeland, Netherlands (2010)

libutron:

Common Cuttlefish Reproduction

Categorized as a shallow water cephalopod, the Common Cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis (Sepiidae), is generally found in the eastern North Atlantic, throughout the English Channel, and south into the Mediterranean Sea, though populations have also been recorded along the west coast of Africa, and as far south as South Africa.

In the spring and summer, male and females migrate to shallow, warmer waters to spawn. They exhibit elaborate courtships, wherein males attract females through spectacular displays of colored bands passing rapidly along their bodies. Males then hold their arms stiffly in a basket formation to show their virility. Similarly, females display a uniform gray color when ready to mate. 

Mating in Sepia officinalis involves internal fertilization, so, eventually the male will grasp a female and mate with her. Using a modified arm, known as the hectocotylus, the male passes spermatophores to the female.

After mating, fertilized eggs are stored in the oviduct of the female until they are ready to be deposited. The female deposits eggs one by one in clusters on seaweeds, shells, or even debris. She blackens them for camouflage with the same ink that cuttlefish use to cast a smoke screen against large predators. The male often remains at her side for some time, but he has no romantic intentions. He is merely trying to prevent her from mating with another male. Mate guarding, in which males aggressively fight over and guard their females, is common.

After spawning both male and females die.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Joris van Alphen | Locality: Oosterschelde, Zeeland, Netherlands (2010)

sixpenceee:

27 years of satellite pictures turned into GIFS. 

Google created the original gifs and TIME supported the time-lapse project. NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey’s Landsat program is how the images were collected in the first place. 

I found this via UPWORTHY

These are some very important GIFs. We are a plague…

So to finish the day we popped to the ‘jungle’ to have a look at a barbary macaque that seemd to be injured.

Usually there are only 2 keepers on the section…lucky 6 of us were there as all 46 macaques suddenly kicked off!! We think it was potentially over a male carrying a baby?

2 fighting males ran straight at me so I had to quickly shut the gate to the section and grab a broom to help get them back over their line.

We thought they had settled a bit but then it all kicked off again and one climbed over an electric fence and came straight at us again. We managed to get him back and then let the public out who had unfortunately been shut in during the palava (all in cars and safe).

Nothing like an adrenalin rush right before home time! Bring on Reading Festival tomorrow!

So James’ quadcopter flew away so we went out to look for it.

Didn’t find it but it was pretty.