27 year old Zoology BSc graduate, paleo-eating, positive thinking fitness girl.Here you will find: Zoology, animals, ferrets, nature, science, anatomy, facts, funny things, geeky stuff, strong women, CrossFit, running, cycling, positive thinking, fitspiration, more zoology, paleo cooking, and a lot of my boyfriend, James! Welcome and enjoy!!

 

libutron:

Boyd’s Forest Dragon
With large pointed scales on a crest behind the head, pinkish flat-topped conical scales on the cheeks and a deep mustard yellow pouch beneath the jaw line, this exquisite medium sized lizard certainly resembles a dragon.
Scientifically named Hypsilurus boydii (Agamidae), this Australian lizard has properly received the common name of Boyd’s Forest Dragon. It is a nocturnal arboreal lizard which reaches up to 49cm in total length.
The Boyd’s Forest Dragon is found only in the wet tropics of Queensland, Australia, into the “Forests of East Australia” Global High Biodiversity Hotspot. 
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Peter Nijenhuis | Locality: Daintree National Park, Thornton Beach, Queensland, Australia

libutron:

Boyd’s Forest Dragon

With large pointed scales on a crest behind the head, pinkish flat-topped conical scales on the cheeks and a deep mustard yellow pouch beneath the jaw line, this exquisite medium sized lizard certainly resembles a dragon.

Scientifically named Hypsilurus boydii (Agamidae), this Australian lizard has properly received the common name of Boyd’s Forest Dragon. It is a nocturnal arboreal lizard which reaches up to 49cm in total length.

The Boyd’s Forest Dragon is found only in the wet tropics of Queensland, Australia, into the “Forests of East Australia” Global High Biodiversity Hotspot. 

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Peter Nijenhuis | Locality: Daintree National Park, Thornton Beach, Queensland, Australia

mountainpeakseeker:

undiscoverred:

 undiscoverred

Haven’t gone camping since I was little. If I don’t have outdoorsy buds in college I might just move to a different continent

mountainpeakseeker:

undiscoverred:

 undiscoverred

Haven’t gone camping since I was little. If I don’t have outdoorsy buds in college I might just move to a different continent

climateadaptation:

"Drone" used to detect illegal logging and deforestation. Concept is to make homebrewed monitoring devices for every-day conservation researchers and environmental activists.

Autopilot drone flying a transect

Background: Autopilot drone developed by a team of ecologists and software developers for forest monitoring, real-time land use mapping, and biodiversity conservation. This is part of a series of field tests in a remote forest area in Sumatra, Indonesia. The plane is fully autopilot, except when landing (due to a small landing area).

Autopilot system is based on ArdupilotMega developed by an open-source community at http://diydrones.com.
The plane is a low cost Hobbyking Bixler RC model.
Camera system is a GoPro Hero HD (version 1).

#1: Logging transect, http://youtu.be/IOm9v0Ewcek
#2: Orangutan search, http://youtu.be/hXTbJA-304k
#3: River mission, http://youtu.be/4icq_takJLw

H/T Revkin

theenergyissue:

A Drone’s-Eye View of Fireworks

Thanks to the recent fireworks frenzy around July 4th, a video uploaded this past May of a GoPro camera-equipped drone flying through live fireworks has gone viral. Using a DJI Phantom 2 quadcopter drone, Jos Stiglingh filmed an eye-level view of a fireworks show in West Palm Beach, Florida, tastefully pairing the footage with tenor Andrea Bocelli’s “Con Te Partiro.” 

dude-thats-rad:

GoPro Cameras are rad as shit. This doesn’t need explaining. The End. 

nubbsgalore:

photos by gerry ellis from the david sheldrick wildlife trust, a nursery and orphanage for elephants in kenya’s tsavo east national park. here, fifty five keepers are charged with being around the clock parents to an elephant. the elephants, however, are the ones who chose their caretakers; it is the keepers who must ingratiate themselves to the elephants and earn their trust.

when elephants first arrive at the orphanage they are often traumatized from having witnessed the slaughter of their mothers and family by poachers. grieving can last several months, and they often lose the will to live. but as dame daphne sheldrick, founder of the orphanage, explains, a caretaker is charged with “persuading an elephant to live when it wants to die.”

approximately 35,000 elephants are killed by humans every year. with an estimated 350,000 elephants left in the whole continent of africa, they will be gone in the wild within ten years.

cbc’s the nature of things did a program on the elephants and their caretakers. you can foster an elephant with the david sheldrick wildlife trust online here. for more on the emotional lives of elephants, as well as the david sheldrick wildlife trust and other human efforts to save them, check out these posts